Wild beauty: black teeth, unibrow and other strange beauty standards of the past
Wild beauty: black teeth, unibrow and other strange beauty standards of the past
Anonim

Many of us try to meet modern beauty standards in one way or another: we go on diets to be slim, buy anti-aging creams to stay young longer, put on makeup every morning, “paint” our face, pluck our eyebrows, and so on. Some beauty rituals give us pleasant emotions, others are tolerant. Throughout the history of mankind, women have had to do many strange things and in every possible way to mock themselves. Our selection contains the wildest beauty standards that the fair sex has faced at different times.

Wild beauty: black teeth, unibrow and other strange beauty standards of the past

Eyelashes and eyebrows were considered redundant during the Renaissance

Indeed, why is this extra facial hair? Women in the Renaissance plucked not only eyebrows, but also eyelashes, as they were considered a sign of excessive sexuality. It even hurts to imagine.

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Black teeth were the ideal of Japanese women

Throughout the 19th century, women in Japan began to blacken their teeth immediately after marriage. This was considered a sign of marital fidelity (and hardly anyone would pay attention to the black-toothed "beauty").

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Girls pasted pieces of fabric on their faces in the 18th century

At that time, heavy and bright makeup came into fashion, and one of its manifestations was flies - colored pieces of fabric that girls pasted on their faces. It could be stars, circles, squares, and their placement on the face had a specific meaning. For example, a front sight near the lips indicated a flirtatious mood, and on the cheek - that a woman is married.

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Women shaved or pulled out hair over their foreheads during the Renaissance

Surely you wondered why girls and women in the paintings of the Renaissance have such strange and unusual faces. One of the reasons is that every now and then they shaved and pulled out the hair just above the forehead. It was part of their standard beauty routine. Thus, they managed to achieve a high, curved forehead, which was an important indicator of the beauty of the time.

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Women painted their feet during World War II

It's all about the shortage of nylon and women's tights. But due to the fact that the legs were supposed to look tanned, paints and varnishes designed to imitate tights hit the market. And many women bought them … and painted their feet.

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Small, misshapen feet were all the rage in China

Foot bandages are one of the most famous wild beauty standards. The "lotus leg" was common among wives and daughters of aristocratic origins in the 13th century, then the practice became widespread in China. At the age of four or five, the girl's foot was bandaged, pressing her fingers to it. The bandages were no longer removed. The foot, of course, did not stop growing, but it was deformed, causing hellish pain. By about 10 years old, the girl received a "graceful" 10-centimeter foot and now could begin to learn to walk again. Alas, some remained chained to a chair until the end of their days, while others could not move without assistance.

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Corsets for separating breasts became fashionable in the 19th century

Corset is another of the most famous body modification devices designed to create a wasp waist and an elevated chest. Women have worn corsets since the 16th century and sacrificed their health for beauty. Complications were very different: compression of the heart muscle, deformation of the bones of the chest, paralysis of the lungs, suffocation, fainting and spontaneous abortion. In the 19th century, corsets came into vogue, which separated the chest and created distance - this was considered beautiful. It is not known what would happen to the poor girls further, if the doctors had not finally started talking about the dangers of corsets.

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Ancient Chinese women dyed their eyebrows in different colors

Recently, we do not get tired of being surprised at all kinds of trends in the shape of eyebrows.Ancient Chinese women also had the opportunity to prove themselves: they painted their eyebrows with green, blue, black paint and gave them bizarre shapes (for example, pointed or curved upwards).

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Pale skin with veins - the ultimate dream of 17th century English girls

Pallor was considered a sign of wealth, so girls and women lightened the skin on the face and décolleté with special powders. In addition, they wore low-cut dresses and painted blue veins on their breasts to simulate translucent skin.

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Chinese women have grown nails up to 25 centimeters

This meant that they were wealthy enough not to work with their hands.

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Native American women plucked private hair

Girls literally pulled out all their pubic hair, because in their tribe they were considered shameful.

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Monobrow was prized in ancient Greece

A fused eyebrow was considered a sign of a girl's intelligence and beauty.

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X-ray for epilation

Wilhelm Roentgen presented his invention in 1895, and almost immediately new applications were found for it. Already in 1886, Leopold Freund reported total hair loss in people who were irradiated for 12 days. This is how X-ray turned into a beauty practice: effective and innovative. However, it soon became clear that it was also fatal: clients who got rid of their hair soon began to die from cancer. But only by the 40s of the XX century the number of patients became so great that the US authorities banned any X-ray epilation procedures.

In France, women had their eyelashes sewn on

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This is now eyelash extension, albeit not the most pleasant, but quite tolerable procedure. But before they were … sewn on! In France, this service was advertised as early as 1882: cocaine was offered to women as pain relievers.

Here's how it happened: a hair from the client's head was threaded into a thin sewing needle, then a specialist pulled this "thread" between the edge of the cartilage and the eyelid. The hair formed loops of precisely adjusted length, which were then cut. New lashes were fitted with a heated silver curler no thicker than a needle. The next day the woman had to spend with a bandage over her eyes, and then constantly curl her eyelashes to make them look like real ones.

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